DATA

TANNER BATES HAS BEEN JUST APPROVED™ JUST SYMBOL - BLACK FOR HANDBAGS & LEATHER+

THE PROS:

Tanner Bates only uses vegetable tanned leather.

The brand reports that its products are designed to last decades and that with proper care can last a lifetime.

Tanner Bates states that it can tell its customers exactly where products have originated from including, when possible, where the cows lived prior to becoming leather.

THE CONS:

The brand hand dyes its products using an aniline dye. Aniline is toxic when the vapour is inhaled and is linked to bladder cancer.

We don’t have any information on how the brand monitors the environmental practices and impacts of its supply chain.

We don’t have any information on what the brand is doing to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions and water use in its supply chain.

/ The brand has 3 full time and 3 part time employees at its stores, distribution centres and head offices.

/ Tanner Bates uses 5 suppliers. The brand states that it uses small family run business for its supplies, which include 3 different tanneries for leather and 2 small companies who supply Tanner Bates with all the hardware fittings and tools.

/ The brand reports that it makes less than 5,000 products annually.

/ Tanner Bates does not release collections but states that it is continually developing its products and listening to feedback from customers as to what they would like to buy, designing new products in line with their feedback.

/ Tanner Bates reports that its products are designed to last decades and that with proper care can last a lifetime.

/ The brand reports that it can trace its entire supply chain.

/ Tanner Bates states that it can tell its customers exactly where products have originated from including, when possible, where the cows lived prior to becoming leather.

/ The brand states that it sources from family run tanneries using traditional processes.

/ Tanner Bates sources oak bark tanned leather from Bakers tannery in East Devon, UK. Bakers tannery is the only tannery left in Europe that supplies oak bark tanned leather. It is powered by a waterwheel using oak bark from the Lake District. The brand states that it works almost exclusively with this type of leather.

/ The brand shares a video about where the different materials from its bags come from and a bit about the tools used to make them. In the video, John Haggar Tanner Bates’ founder states that the man who makes the hardware for his products is called Barry, and that he knows the bees that make the bees wax for the bees wax preparation he uses on the edges of his bags. Haggar shares that all of the bags are hand stitched.

/ The brand shares where each product was made and where the materials were sourced from in the product descriptions.

/ John Hagger, the brand’s founder, regularly travels to Spain and Italy to spend time with the family run tanneries where Tanner Bates gets some of its leather from.

/ The brand’s founder, John Hagger, states that he knows the people by name who make Tanner Bates’ raw materials.

/ Tanner Bates rents a 500 sq ft workshop on the Dartington Estate in South Devon where John Hagger makes the brand’s products with an apprentice.

/ John Hagger travels to places like Ubrique in Spain and Florence in Italy to source potential suppliers of leather. He looks for small family run businesses who have a true passion for creating beautiful vegetable tanned leather. The brand reports that it sources from small suppliers to support the traditional values that these places hold as well as minimise the risk of faceless poorly paid workers with unknown working conditions.

/ Tanner Bates reports that it pay its workers the national living wage or higher.

/ Tanner Bates reports that all the leather that it uses is a by-product from the meat industry. The brand feels strongly about ensuring that the whole animal is being used and respected.

/ Tanner Bates only uses vegetable tanned leather.

/ The brand sources oak bark tanned leather from Bakers tannery in East Devon, UK. Bakers tannery is the only tannery left in Europe that supplies oak bark tanned leather. It is powered by a waterwheel using oak bark from the Lake District.

/ Tanner Bates hand dyes its products using an aniline dye. Aniline is toxic when the vapour is inhaled and is linked to bladder cancer.

/ We don’t have any information on what the brand is doing to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions and water use in its supply chain.

/ In March 2016, The Guardian reported that Tanner Bates founder John Hagger is a third-generation leather worker who trained as a saddler, who admits he’s been asked to make pieces before out of synthetic materials but couldn’t bring himself to do it. The article reported that as part of his quest to know where the leather he uses comes from, he has driven animals to the slaughter house – and slaughtered some himself. Some of his pieces are made from roadkill deer.

/ The brand’s founder, John Hagger, travels specifically to places like Ubrique in Spain and Florence in Italy to source potential suppliers of leather. He looks for small family run businesses who have a true passion for creating beautiful vegetable tanned leather. The brand reports that it sources from small suppliers to support the traditional values that these places hold as well as minimise the risk of faceless poorly paid workers with unknown working conditions.

 

/ The brand’s founder made a leather football from tanned road kill deer skin for the Homeground project run by the Devon Guild of Craftsmen. This football is part of the touring exhibition which will visit towns and cities whose football club origins are associated with a different craft industry.

 

/ Tanner Bates is a privately owned company.

/ We don’t have any information on how much the CEO made in the last financial year.

/ There are no reported management scandals or issues.

 

/ Tanner Bates sources oak bark tanned leather from Bakers tannery in East Devon, UK. Bakers tannery is the only tannery left in Europe that supplies oak bark tanned leather. It is powered by a waterwheel using oak bark from the Lake District.

/ The brand uses a number of traditional techniques to tan its leather.

/ The brand’s founder, John Hagger states that he knows the people by name who make Tanner Bates’ raw materials.

/ Occasionally Tanner Bates tans the skins of locally culled deer from the Dartington Estate and nearby Dartmoor and occasionally retrieves roadkill.

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VOICES

LUCY SIEGLE | THE GUARDIAN

“I find his (John Hagger’s) approach to provenance enormously respectful of the animal. For me it’s the antithesis of the chaotic global supply chain. It feels like the humane way forward.” – 03/13/2016


 

RACHEL, TANNER BATES EMPLOYEE

“I personally feel there is a very open policy here and we are all comfortable to work and live within our own boundaries and ensure our needs are met. Discussions happen regularly as do all team meetings down the pub.”

JOHN HAGGER, FOUNDER

“I was very aware from the start, when I knew I wanted to be a leatherworker, that this wasn’t just fabric I was working with. This was once the skin of a living animal. I wanted to know where this amazing material comes from and that wasn’t discussed at all during my training.”

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