DATA

THE PROS:

Reformation is a certified B Corp holding themselves accountable to a high set of standards on both environmental and social practices

Reformation calculates the carbon and water footprints of their products and using the initiative RefScale publishes these numbers in their product descriptions. The whole equation follows the lifecycle of clothes—everything from growing textile fibers and making fabric, dyeing, moving materials, manufacturing, packaging, shipping, garment care, and recycling clothes when you’re done with them.

The brand only uses materials with a sustainability ethos. This includes, Tencel, rescued deadstock fabrics and repurposed vintage clothing, modal, viscose certified by OEKO-TEX 100, Recover© yarn (a blend of recycled cotton from recovered garments, and recycled polyester from dumped plastic bottles), Lenzing Viscose, alpaca wool.

THE CONS:

They have a “sustainable partners program to move past compliance” . We weren’t able to find a code of compliance so we will be following up with them to understand how they’re working with their suppliers.

It doesn’t appear that they’ve traced many of their raw materials sources although they only produce in the US, at their own factory and another factory not far from their HQ in LA. They try to source raw goods locally first regardless of cost. Currently about half of the brand’s raw goods come from the US. The other half is purchased from overseas suppliers in China and India.

 

The brand has 3 stores.

/ According to an article by the LA Times in 2015, the brand launches fifteen new styles in three colors each, every week.  And they produce 200 pieces of each of those styles. We did the math, that is 9000 items per week, 468,000 a year.

/ Reformation designs each garment to last an average of 52 washes.

/ According to an article by the LA Times in 2015, the company’s revenue in 2014 was $25 million.

/ Reformation is a certified B Corp.

 

 

 

 

/ There is a public list of countries of suppliers but Reformation does not share a public list of suppliers’ names and addresses.

/ It is implied that the brand can trace their entire supply chain but Reformation does not state this specifically.

/ The brand communicates to shoppers the environmental impact of each item through displaying RefScale on each product page.

 

 

 

 

 

/ The brand doesn’t have a publicly available code of conduct.

/ Reformation launched a sustainable partners program to work with their suppliers. They say the program’s goal is “to move past compliance, and into awesomeness by investing in their sustainability programs–whether here or abroad.” This is all they say about the program.

/ Reformation says that most of their hourly workers are paid more than minimum wage, and over half are paid above the LA living wage threshold. In reference to their factory they state that they offer their entire staff fair wages.

/ Reformation screens their suppliers for negative social and environmental practices, seeking those with eco-friendly manufacturing processes and fair, safe labor practices.

/ B Corp states that Reformation has a written whistle-blowing policy that provides legal protection to workers.

 

 

 

 

/ The brand only uses materials with a sustainability ethos. This includes, Tencel, rescued deadstock fabrics and repurposed vintage clothing, modal, viscose certified by OEKO-TEX 100, Recover© yarn (a blend of recycled cotton from recovered garments, and recycled polyester from dumped plastic bottles), Lenzing Viscose, alpaca wool.

/ To celebrate Earth Day 2016, Reformation released a “new super sustainable” Earth Day Collection.

/ The brand offsets its carbon footprint by helping plant forests to naturally capture CO2 from the air, investing in clean water solutions, and purchasing landfill gas offsets.

/ The brand calculates the carbon and water footprints of their products and using the initiative RefScale publishes these numbers in their product descriptions. The whole equation follows the lifecycle of clothes—everything from growing textile fibers and making fabric, dyeing, moving materials, manufacturing, packaging, shipping, garment care, and recycling clothes when you’re done with them.

/ Reformation launched RefRecycling that allows customers to send in their old clothes for recycling. Customers can also track the positive impact and see where their old clothes have gone.

/ The brand is working towards measuring other important factors with RefScale like waste, toxicity and fair labor. At the end of the year they will publish the totals for all the resources they used, saved, and offset.

/ Reformation’s goals for 2015 are as stated on their blog:

  • Zero Waste is our Goal. We currently recycle about 60% of all our garbage. Our goal for 2015 is to reach 75%.
  • We will start a program where we collect and recycle 10 tons of your used clothing a year.
  • Through investing in technology, we will cut down on our fabric waste by 50%.
  • We will implement new techniques in natural or waterless dyed fabrics for at least 50% of our products.
  • We will set even higher standards for our suppliers and will launch the “think green initiative”, to work with them to achieve these goals.
  • Our product development will improve so at least 60% of our clothes are labeled hand wash or machine wash cold, which are the most environmentally friendly methods.
  • Our team will get an optional paid day off a month to volunteer in their local communities.

/ They do not share how they are measuring the progress towards achieving these goals.

/ The brand provides employees one paid day off a month to volunteer, and encourages them to make a positive impact in their communities. They also offer company-wide service days several times a year, and highlight volunteer opportunities regularly.

/ The brand launched the No Red Carpet Needed Collection where 25% of proceeds went to support sustainable education at the MUSE School CA.

/ The brand planted trees through a donation to TreePeople for staff birthdays.

/ Sales from Earth Day sweatshirts went to support TreePeople.

 

 

 

 

 

/ Unsure of how much the CEO makes.

/ No reported management issues or scandals.

/ The brand has initiated RefScale which measures the carbon and water footprint of a garment and compares it to the industry standard.

/ The brand tries to source raw goods locally first regardless of cost. Currently about half of the brand’s raw goods come from the US. The other half is purchased from overseas suppliers in China and India.

/ All of the cutting and sewing is done in Los Angeles. 70% is done in their own factory and the rest is carried out at another factory a few miles away.

/ The brand states that their factory uses the most efficient, eco-friendly and pro-social technologies and practices available. They invest in green building infrastructure to minimize their waste, water, and energy footprints.

/ Reformation launched RefRecycling that allows customers to send in their old clothes for recycling. Customers can also track the positive impact and see where their old clothes have gone.

CONTRIBUTE
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VOICES

EMILY HOLT | VOGUE

“Reformation’s distinctly of-the-people ethos, along with its mission to create conscientiously, isn’t a mere business differentiator: It’s the whole point.” November 4th, 2015

 


ILANA KAPLAN | NEW YORK OBSERVER

“The brand’s ethos is to combine ethical clothes, really great value and dramatic improvement with regards to sustainability—something that can sometimes be a rare find in the retail market.” June 22nd, 2015

 


JOHN KOBLIN | THE NEW YORK TIMES

“When a customer walks into Reformation’s SoHo store, these are the words that greet you: “Change the World Without Changing Your Style.” December 17th, 2014

“I want to lead a movement towards a world where sustainable manufacturing is the status quo,” Yael Aflalo, in an interview with MeiMei Fox on Huffington Post

“It’s very much training people to think about how much things cost — not just to their wallet, but to the environment,” Yael Aflalo, on LA Times

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